Are you the Moodle help?

I started drafting this post last month after I attended a White Rose Learning Technology forum at University of Huddersfield and there was some discussion around learning technologists and professional identity. The discussions took place in the context of a workshop on gaining CMALT accreditation, but some further discussions about learning technology roles more generally at Digifest last week spurred me on to finish the post.

The main question that’s been hanging over me is: is learning technology/technology enhanced learning suffering from a professional identity crisis? As a relative newcomer to the profession (less than four years) and after spending around 5-6 years before that working towards becoming a librarian and building a professional identity in that field, I’ve often found it difficult to feel like I know where I fit in terms of the learning technology profession.

Imposter syndrome aside (and I’ve got another post dedicated to that also in draft at the moment – you’re in for a treat!), the discussions I’ve been part of at recent events have made me realise I’m not alone in feeling this way. Many people in learning technology/ed tech/TEL roles, whatever you want to call them, have come from such a variety of backgrounds that it’s no wonder there’s a perceived struggle to assert ourselves as a collective and consistent ‘voice’. Often, it’s even a struggle to get staff across our institutions to understand what we do and where our expertise lies. People have come from library backgrounds, teaching, IT Support desk and training roles, even academia. Some are actually academics and have lecturing roles and others are on professional services/support staff contracts. I think part of the issue could be the language we use to define ourselves. I saw Melissa Highton speak at Digifest last week and they raised some good points about the semantics around terms like ‘Technology Enhanced Learning’ and ‘Virtual Learning Environment’. Melissa’s latest blog post goes deeper into some of this.

Even when you look at jobs that are advertised through the ALT newsletter and various mailing lists, there are some that have a stronger focus on instructional design work, some that have a strong focus on supporting systems and others that focus on staff development, training and pedagogical knowledge. I know that mine is a combination of all three and is likely to evolve over the next year or so, depending on the projects I’m going to be working on.

Don’t get me wrong, I really like working in this field and I’ve met some of the most intelligent, forward thinking and professional people I’ve ever worked with during my time in learning technology roles. I’ve also loved being able to work with teaching staff in both FE and HE and I’ve learned so much in the last 3 and a half years. I also think the work of organisations like ALT and Jisc do allow us to find common ground and a common language across institutions and sectors.

In an attempt to be more optimistic in 2017, I do think there is more that connects us than divides us. Perhaps this isn’t a ‘problem’ that necessarily needs to be solved and we just need to celebrate the diverse nature of our roles and the messy nature of education. Maybe the old librarian part of my brain was wanting to categorise and catalogue everything so it made sense. Who am I kidding, though? I was never any good at cataloguing anyway…

I’m interested to find out what other LT people think and whether my identity crisis is entirely of my own making!

Hare of the Blog

Well, I ultimately failed at participating in Digital Writing Month in any kind of meaningful way. Two days after my first post, my laptop broke and I have only just regained access to a working computer at home. I still had my iPad mini but I didn’t fancy being hunched over that and typing for extended periods of time – my poor neck and shoulder muscles!

Instead, I will crack on with what was going to be one of the longer term aims of this blog anyway: blogging for professional development. I am always lamenting the fact that the working days/weeks/months are whizzing past and I haven’t had any proper time to sit and reflect on the work I’ve done and where I’m going next. Plus, a blog is a great space for the longer stuff that doesn’t necessarily fit on Twitter or Facebook. Someone (Ned Potter) suggested that I call my blog ‘Hare of the Blog’* but I feel like the novelty will soon wear off with that, as funny as it is, so I just thought I would name my first blog post that instead.

I recognise that I am in the fortunate position to be in a job where, on occasion, I have the time to think about and read around the subjects that impact directly or indirectly on my profession. One of my resolutions for 2016 is to use this space to reflect on my work and the wider issues in Technology Enhanced Learning, Higher Education and education more generally. I imagine that the 3 people who end up reading this blog will no doubt be working in TEL or related fields, but I also like to be aware of the ever-looming ‘bigger picture’ so expect musings and stream-of-consciousness style posts on the impact of politics and social and cultural change on education and communities. I don’t have any other hobbies.

For those who are wondering who the hell I am and what I do, you can visit my team’s website to find blog posts from me and my colleagues and more information about the work we do in UK Higher Education. My aim is to blog around once a month, so watch this space!

*For posterity, I will put this in writing here: when I open my dog grooming business in the future, it will be called Hare of the Dog. Got to love a surname that you can build puns from.